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Role of a Conservator in a Probate Case

By: Attorney Shira Truitt


A conservator is a person who is appointed by a court to manage the financial and personal affairs of another person, known as the conservatee. A conservator may be necessary when the conservatee is unable to manage their own affairs due to age, disability, or illness.

In Missouri, a conservator may be appointed for a person who is incapacitated or disabled and unable to manage their own affairs. This can include individuals who are suffering from a physical or mental disability, or who are unable to make informed decisions about their own care due to age or illness.

In Illinois, a conservator may be appointed for a person who is unable to manage their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability, or due to age. A conservator may also be appointed for a person who is at risk of financial exploitation or abuse, or who is unable to provide for their own basic needs such as food, clothing, and shelter.

The role of a conservator is to make decisions and take actions on behalf of the conservatee in matters relating to their personal care and financial affairs. This can include paying bills, managing assets, and making decisions about the conservatee's living arrangements and medical care.

A conservator is required to act in the best interests of the conservatee and to follow the terms of the conservatorship order issued by the court. They must also keep detailed records of their actions and report to the court on a regular basis.

Ensuring that a loved one has the least restrictive environment is important, especially if they can make day-to-day decisions but require assistance with financial decisions. A conservatorship is a wise choice to accomplish that goal and ensure the well-being of everyone involved.

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If you need legal advice or a lawyer in Illinois or Missouri, please contact The Truitt Law Firm, LLC for assistance. For more information on The Truitt Law Firm, LLC or to schedule an appointment, please go to www.thetruittlawfirm.com.




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